Category: Corporate power

How social justice helps corporations put on a human face

How social justice helps corporations put on a human face

It is now widely known that most of the world’s great conglomerates and trans-national corporations are violating some of the most fundamental ethical codes we abide by. Nike used child labour for its production of footballs in Cambodia and Pakistan, Unilever and Amazon openly exploit their workers (Werner & Weiss, 2001), and these are just some of the plenty of examples of corporations exploiting their market power in order to achieve whatever their goals are as businesses. The phenomenon of increased attention to political issues such as social justice in our society recently could have been a way for the working class to finally expose these wrongdoings of the corporations.

The corporation in global society

The corporation in global society

Today economic activities and power are globally concentrated in a few large corporations. An active civil society, powered with mass media and information and communications technology along with social media easily locates the social and environmental impacts of the activities of corporations. This way corporations can be held accountable for any of their adverse actions and complemented / incentivised for their responsible actions.

Facebook: Just another corporation

Facebook: Just another corporation

In today’s world, we are surrounded by corporations of many different kinds. From fast food chains like McDonald’s, to retail chains such as Walmart. These corporations appeal to the masses, and their status as corporations is clear from the fact that they sell us things. However, in this post, I would like to bring to attention a corporation that does not sell us any tangible object, social media. Social media generates revenue mainly through companies paying them for advertisements, not through selling the public things. Social media is widely used by many corporations in an attempt to reach out to their audience, but we often forget that they are corporations themselves. In this article, I hope to be able to show that, in the end, social media firms are just like any other corporation, that they are affected by the same thing as other corporations worldwide are affected by, perhaps even more given the nature of the internet.

Is it time to protest the platform?

Is it time to protest the platform?

You probably brush your teeth with a multinational conglomerate; hear from friends through a tech giant and drive using a horizontally integrated car firm. That is because corporations, those powerful social and economic institutions, have become embedded in our modern lives. We occasionally like to ask whether this is right, whether society should allow corporations to have more power and influence than our governments. We take to Twitter, rant on Facebook and document on Snapchat. As will be noted here, this sometimes leads to mobilising at a physical protest, too. After all, only our governments are (democratically) elected, and only they are designed to maximise social welfare, so upholding them against the motives of corporations doesn’t seem like a bad idea. Rightly or wrongly, corporations will always pursue profit. That is their nature, their design and it is wonderfully predictable. It is why economists are always quoted as saying that profit maximisation is the ‘aim’ of a corporation, because it is what evidence predominately suggests – not what economists prescribe corporations to do.