Category: Climate change and sustainable development

Why cutting back on meat is the best thing you can do for the planet.

Why cutting back on meat is the best thing you can do for the planet.

According to a report by the UN, the global livestock industry contributes to 18% of human produced greenhouse gas emissions across the globe – that’s more than all transport methods put together. However, this is rarely shown in the media. We are often told to “cut down on shorter car journeys” or encouraged to “take public transport,” whilst there are bigger issues staring us in the face.

This is a time of environmental emergency: What can be done to reduce the impact of climate change?

This is a time of environmental emergency: What can be done to reduce the impact of climate change?

In today’s society the impact of climate change is evident in almost all aspects of life: rising global temperatures, increasing land, air and sea pollution, biodiversity loss, water scarcity, food insecurity and the energy crisis. As the current generation of young people is becoming increasingly aware of their uncertain future as a result of human activity (John Urry, 2009 p.96) on climate change, it is clear that immediate action needs to be taken to prevent further damage to the planet and to limit the impact that climate change has already had on it.

The impact of climate change

The impact of climate change

Climate Change is bound to have an effect on the patterns of crops, wildlife, and our lives, too. The threat to our economic and social organisation would be considerable (Urry, 2010). This is evident in the rise of storms, hurricanes, heat waves and floods that damage property and cause longer dry periods that are an increasing problem for our agricultural economy.

A few degrees don’t matter!

A few degrees don’t matter!

The temperature on earth has risen by 1.5 degrees since 1880. If this rises further by 0.5 degrees to 2 degrees, we will have passed the critical threshold of being able to reverse the effects of climate change. There is a 50% risk of global temperatures increasing by 5 degrees by 2100 (Urry, 2009). This tipping point is so close that it should be a major red flag to every leading superpower, but it is not.